Standards Implementation

Standards Implementation: Partners' Perspectives

On November 18th, 2016, key administrators from the state departments of education in California, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Ohio, and Texas convened for “A Conversation on College- and Career-Readiness Standards” hosted by C-SAIL in Washington, D.C. Also in attendance were professional organizations representing teachers, principals, superintendents, and policymakers across the country.

States finding success, challenges implementing college- and career-readiness standards, reports find

Philadelphia, Pa. (January 31, 2017) – The Common Core and other college- and career-readiness standards have dominated education policy debates for almost a decade. But less attention is paid to how those standards are put into practice. The Center on Standards, Alignment, Instruction, and Learning (C-SAIL) is releasing the first detailed picture of implementation in four states: Kentucky, Massachusetts, Ohio, and Texas. These reports track states taking different approaches to standard reform, and begin to identify successes and challenges from which other states can learn.

Year 1 State Report: Texas

This report examines how the state of Texas is approaching CCR standards implementation during a time of transition. The state has recently implemented revisions to the math standards and is currently revising the English language arts (ELA) standards. The revised ELA standards are expected to be ready for full implementation in the 2018–2019 school year. For the purposes of this report and in keeping with C-SAIL’s focus, we concentrate on implementation of Texas’s ELA and math standards.

Year 1 State Report: Ohio

This report examines how the state of Ohio is approaching CCR standards implementation during a time of transition, as they revised the Ohio Learning Standards in 2015–2016. The approval process will take place in 2016–2017, with new materials and revised standards ready for the 2017–2018 school year. For the purposes of this report and in keeping with C-SAIL’s focus, we concentrate on implementation of Ohio’s English language arts (ELA) and math standards.

Year 1 State Report: Massachusetts

This report examines how the state of Massachusetts is approaching CCR standards implementation during a time of transition, as it develops the Next-Generation Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System, or the “Next-Gen MCAS,” in 2015–2016. The transition will take place in 2016–2017, with full implementation of the next-generation assessment by the spring of 2017. For the purposes of this report and in keeping with C-SAIL’s focus, we concentrate on implementation of Massachusetts’ English language arts (ELA) and math standards.

Year 1 State Report: Kentucky

This report examines how the state of Kentucky is continuing CCR standards implementation during a time of transition. As their state legislature mandates a review of the standards and accountability system every six years, the Kentucky Department of Education (KDE) is in the midst of drafting potential revisions for public review and official implementation by summer 2017. For the purposes of this report and in keeping with C-SAIL’s focus, we concentrate on implementation of Kentucky’s English language arts (ELA) and math standards.

Was Race to the Top Too Much of a Race?


Twenty20

With the Obama administration drawing to a close and the Department of Education partially retreating from 15 years of highly active, interventionist education policy, it seems an appropriate time to analyze the effects of the signature Obama education policy, Race to the Top. 

Implementation Findings: Authority in Massachusetts and Ohio


(Twenty20)

We have begun to analyze our interview and survey data from 2015-2016. Here I highlight key findings from our teacher, principal and district surveys, as well as our state and district interviews, beginning with the role of authority in Massachusetts and Ohio.

Policies gain authority through:

Common-Core Reading Materials Get Mixed Results in First Major Review

Is it true that “what you test is what you get”?


Twenty20

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