Implementation Study

This Week’s ESSA News: Preschool Programs More Segregated Than K-12 Schools, Montana Receives $50 Million Literacy Grant, Failing Foster Kids & More

Adam Kirk Edgerton explores the relationship between state education departments and the districts they oversee under the Every Student Succeeds Act. “Since 2015, a team of faculty and graduate student researchers at the Center on Standards, Alignment, Instruction, and Learning (C-SAIL) has collected a broad range of data on ESSA’s implementation across the country, as well as data specific to California, Texas, Ohio, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, and Massachusetts,” he writes.

Search The essence of ESSA: More control at the district level?

Both rhetorically and substantively, the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 (ESSA) served as a rebuke to the now-unpopular policies pursued by both the Bush and Obama administrations (American National Election Survey, 2018; Edgerton, 2019). Not only did it reduce the discretion of the secretary of education but also it allowed states greater flexibility in meeting the demands of standards-based accountability.

Learning From Standards Deviations: Three Dimensions for Building Education Policies That Last

Cynthia Coburn, in her 2016 article in the American Journal of Education—“What’s Policy Got to Do With It?”—states that the field of policy implementation suffers from the propensity to learn the same lessons over and over again. This repetition of mistakes stems from a failure to account for predictable patterns in how policies become unpopular. Through an analysis of 52 interviews with state, regional, and district officials in California, Texas, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Massachusetts, C-SAIL's Adam K.

New Standards and Old Divides: Policy attitudes about college- and career-ready standards for students with disabilities

Background/Context: The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA, 2004) requires that all students with disabilities (SWD) receive a free, appropriate public education designed to meet their unique needs to prepare them for post-school education and employment (American Psychological Association, 2018). In the past two decades, momentum has grown for a supplementary idea: that schools be held accountable for SWD achieving grade-level standards. Thus standards-based reform for SWD is often caught between ideals of standardization and principles of differentiation.

Mind the Gaps: Differences in How Teachers, Principals, and Districts Experience College- and Career-Readiness Policies

Critics of standards-based reform often cite an accountability policy environment that disproportionately affects teachers compared with principals and district officials. We directly examine this disproportionality. In our three study states of Texas, Ohio, and Kentucky, we use survey analysis to understand how policy environments for district officials, principals, and teachers differ. We find that in all three states, teachers report experiencing significantly more accountability than do principals.

New! Research Brief on Massachusetts' Implementation of Standards

How are districts in different states implementing college- and career-readiness (CCR) standards? The Center on Standards, Alignment, Instruction, and Learning (C-SAIL), has partnered with California, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Ohio, and Texas to find out. In a new brief, we focus on implementation in six Massachusetts districts.

New! Research Brief on California’s Implementation of Standards

How are districts in different states implementing college- and career-readiness (CCR) standards? The Center on Standards, Alignment, Instruction, and Learning (C-SAIL), has partnered with California, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Ohio, and Texas to find out. In a new brief, we focus on implementation in six California districts.

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